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THE GRAMMAR PAGE “As” and “like”


Spotlight - epaper ⋅ Ausgabe 5/2019 vom 10.04.2019

ADRIAN DOFF presents and explains this key point of grammar with notes on a short dialogue.


MEDIUM PLUS

PLUS
Find more exercises in Spotlight plus: spotlight-online.de/spotlight-plus

Dialogue
Celina has tried making pizza using a recipe from her sister, Katie.

Katie: How did the pizza turn out?
Celina: Not very well. In fact, it was a bit of a disaster.
The dough tastedlike1 cardboard. It didn’t rise at
all, notlike1 your pizza dough.
Katie: ...

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Nächster Artikel LOST IN TRANSLATION: weasel words
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Katie: How did the pizza turn out?
Celina: Not very well. In fact, it was a bit of a disaster.
The dough tastedlike1 cardboard. It didn’t rise at
all, notlike1 your pizza dough.
Katie: Oh, dear! I wonder why.
Celina: I don’t know. I did everything exactlyas2 you said. I mixed olive oil with the flour, I added salt and sugar, I kneaded it for 10 minutes, justas2 you told me to… Maybe I’m just notas good at cookingas3 you are.
Katie: Did you use fresh yeast,as4 I suggested? Dried
yeastisn’t nearly as5 good.
Celina: Yeast?
Katie: You did put yeast in, didn’t you?
Celina: Ah! So that’s why it didn’t rise.

Explanations

1. To say that things are similar, you can uselike before anoun (cardboard) or anoun phrase (your pizza dough).
2.As can be used before aclause (subject + verb) — “as you said”, “as you told me to”. In informal English, many people also uselike here (like you said).
3.As… as… is used with anadjective oradverb to make a comparison (not as good … as; twice as good as).
4. This is another example ofas before a clause (as I suggested).
5. This is a further example ofas + adjective to make a comparison. Katie means “dried yeast is not as good as fresh yeast”. Here, she addsnot nearly to emphasize that there is a big difference.

Remember!

You can use bothlike andas to say that things are similar.

Like is apreposition and comes before a noun or a phrase:
• Romanian sounds a bit like Portuguese.
As is aconjunction , the purpose of which is to join two clauses, so it comes before a subject + verb:
• Traffic in Bangkok is very heavy, as it is in many Asian cities. Although not strictly correct, many people uselike instead ofas in informal speech:
• As/Like I said, I’m busy this evening.
As often appears in common fixed phrases; for example,as you know ,as I said ,as usual :
•I’m away next week, as you know.
• He’s late, as usual.
To make a comparison, one can use(not) as … as … with an adjective
or adverb:
• Her French isn’t as good as her Italian.
• Grandad can’t hear as well as he used to.

Beyond the basics

As can also be used as apreposition (before a noun), but it has a different meaning. Compare:
• Like his father, he became a doctor. (= similar to his father)
• As a father, I can understand how you feel. (= because I’m a father)
• Although she’s over 50, she still dresses like a student. (= in a way similar to a student)
• She lived in Paris for a time as a student. (= when she was a student)

In Spoken English, Adrian Doff looks at other ways of making comparisons. Turn to page 60 to find colloquial expressions used to talk about things that are the same, similar or different.


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